More Personal Tax to pay in January 2018?

No one wants to pay more tax, but from 6th April 2016, individuals who receive dividends will be taxed under new legislation. To explain how much this new measure could cost you we have created a short helpful video. 

Please visit our YouTube channel here to watch.  

Having viewed the video, if you would like to know how this will personally affect you in January 2018, please click here. 

VAT on Commercial Vehicles

You would think that it was easy to identify a commercial vehicle, such as a HGV or a transit van and in most cases it is. However vehicle companies are now manufacturing vehicles that have a dual purpose.

These vehicles are car derived vans which are sold as lifestyle vehicles that can also be used for private use, they may look similar to cars but the manufacturer will have altered the inside so it can be sold as a commercial vehicle. For example the rear seats and seat belts may have been removed.

HMRC have produced a list of dual purpose vehicles such as combi vans and double cab pick-ups which highlights which vehicles are classed as commercial and which are not.

If you are claiming back the VAT on a commercial vehicle it is important to identify when it is being used for private use, as the VAT man will thoroughly check when this is occurring! If there is any private use then there may be a claw-back of VAT claimed. The VAT man will allow for occasional personal use of a commercial vehicle, but it is important to be able to prove it is only incidental use.

In essence, if you buy a commercial vehicle for your business you can normally reclaim the VAT in full. However, if it has a dual purpose and it is used significantly for personal use, there will be a restriction on the VAT that can be reclaimed.

If you require any further information on this please contact the office on 0116 242 3400.

Tom Luckett, Accounts & Tax

Have you paid your self-assessment bill?

Tax Payments – How late can you be?

With the madness of the January tax return deadline, it may have slipped some of your minds to actually pay your self-assessment bill. If this is the case then you may be wondering how you will be penalised for doing so.

For those that have filed their self-assessment tax return before the deadline but have not paid the bill, there will be interest accruing at 2.75% pa for the first 30 days.

However, after 30 days from the deadline the full amount of tax due will be subject to a 5% penalty. This means that if you had a liability of £5,000 unpaid by midnight on 2 March 2017, there would be an immediate fine of £250 added to your account.

Similarly, if after 6 and 12 months from the filing deadline you have not paid the full balance, then there would be additional 5% penalties on the tax outstanding at those dates.

Furthering the example above, should there still be an outstanding debt of £5,000 on 1 August 2017 then an additional £250 penalty will be accrued and if the debt has still not been settled by 1 February 2018 then another £250 will be added. This means that within just 12 months, a £5,000 tax bill will have penalties totaling £750.

On top of this there will also still be interest accruing on both the tax and penalties. Making the estimated amount owing on 1 February 2018 £5,887.

Sam Jefferson, Accounts & Tax 

If you need further help please contact us.

Correcting Errors on Your VAT Return

Picture the scene: it’s the end of the month, you’ve just submitted your VAT return for the quarter, you close your laptop and there behind it is a small pile of invoices that you’d forgotten to include.

This isn’t uncommon.  Here’s a few questions that you might be thinking:

Can I amend the return that I’ve submitted?

Unfortunately not, once the return is submitted there is no mechanism to adjust or amend it.

Can I just pay the correct amount?

Again, this isn’t accepted by HMRC. Their systems will assume you’ve under/overpaid and may charge interest & penalties or refund any overpayment.

OK, how do I make the correction?

There are two methods to fix an error on a VAT return, and which one to use depends on the size of the mistake.

  • If the net value of the errors is £10,000 or less; or
  • Less than 1% of your box 6 figure and less than £50,000

Then you can adjust the mistake on your next VAT return by adding the value to box 1 or box 4 as required. You will also need to keep details of the inaccuracy should HMRC ever enquire about the return.

If the errors do not meet the threshold above, then you are required to report them to HMRC immediately.

You should complete a form VAT652 which can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/vat-notification-of-errors-in-vat-returns-vat-652

HMRC may charge you interest and penalties if they deem the error to be due to careless or dishonest behaviour.

If you’d like any assistance in making the adjustments, please feel free to get in touch with our team on 0116 242 3400.

Matt Smith- Accountant, Audit & Tax Matt Smith

 

ARE YOU THINKING OF SELLING YOUR BUSINESS?

Selling a business can be a lengthy and stressful process. A sale may be considered due to pending retirement, illness, a lifestyle change, or a host of other reasons. The better and more time you have to prepare for a sale, the less stressful the experience will be.

Here at Torr Waterfield, we can help you with the process, from start to finish. Here are a few pointers to help you on your way…..

  • Review the strengths and weaknesses of your business. A SWOT analysis will help you to identify and address the weaknesses and threats, and improve the strengths and opportunities before sale
  • Consider the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) of the business, and how these can be identified and reviewed both by you and a potential buyer
  • What do you think the business is worth and what is the minimum value you would be prepared to sell it for? Just as importantly, are there likely to be potential buyers willing to pay that minimum price?
  • Consider ways to increase sales and reduce costs in the immediate period prior to sale. A business is often valued on a price to earnings ratio or earnings multiple method, so recent increased profitability can increase its value
  • Consider the infrastructure and management profile of the business, and whether the necessary skills and knowhow are sufficient in the event of your retirement/removal
  • Consider your own tax position and ensure the sale method is the most suitable to you e.g. Entrepreneur’s Relief is available for business asset and share sales fitting certain criteria. This relief allows chargeable gains on sales to be taxed at 10%, even for higher rate tax payers. Other sales methods, such as sale of assets and goodwill, may be more appropriate
  • Consider employee issues in the event of a sale; e.g. does TUPE (transfer of employment rights) apply? How will your employees react prior to and after a sale? Do you advise them of your plans and keep them up to date with progress?
  • Ensure that the position, legal or otherwise, and potential impact on a sale of any minority shareholders or partners has been taken into account
  • Consider what may happen to the business premises; will they be part of the sale? Are they owned by your Personal Pension, in which case it may be worthwhile continuing to lease the premises to the purchaser?
  • Appoint professional advisors and expert help to assist with your valuation, to help with any legal agreements that need to be drawn up and to review your tax position prior to and after the sale

You only sell your business once, so it must be done properly to ensure you get full benefit.

If you would like to find out more about selling your business, please speak to me at Torr Waterfield

Peter Morris , Director _DSC4779