The following Tax Events are due on 31st October 2017

Personal Tax Events

Deadline for submission of 2016/17 self assessment returns if you require HMRC to compute your tax liability and/or if tax underpaid is to be collected by adjustment to your 2018/19 PAYE code.

This deadline is only relevant for those individuals who complete a ‘paper’ self assessment tax return and who are employees. Where you have an underpayment you may request that HMRC collect the tax outstanding by making an adjustment to your tax code for the year 2018/19.

Please note that where your return is submitted online then the filing deadline for ‘coding out’ is 30 December 2017.

If we are already dealing with this matter on your behalf you need take no action.

Deadline for submitting ‘paper’ 2016/17 self assessment returns.

This deadline is relevant to individuals who need to complete a self assessment tax return for 2016/17 and wish to file the return in a ‘paper’ form. Self assessment returns submitted after this date must be submitted electronically.

Please note that this deadline is not relevant if we are going to submit an online return for you or you are going to deal with the completion of an online return yourself. The deadline for submission of online returns is 31 January 2018.

If we are already dealing with this matter on your behalf you need take no action.

If you would like to discuss this further please get in touch 0116 2423400

What is the VAT cash accounting scheme?

What is the VAT cash accounting scheme?

The VAT cash accounting scheme is a useful tool for many small businesses, as you only pay the VAT on your sales to HMRC once you have received payment yourself.

However, you may only reclaim VAT on your purchases from HMRC when payment of the invoice has been made.

You can join the cash accounting scheme if your turnover is less than £1.35m, and can continue to use the scheme until your turnover reaches more than £1.6m.

Your business should be eligible to use the scheme if you meet the threshold requirement, unless your VAT affairs are not up-to-date, you have been convicted of a VAT offence or have been penalised for evading VAT over the past 12 months.

What is the advantage of using cash accounting?

Clearly the main benefit of joining this VAT scheme is in the cash flow benefits it provides. If you have a late paying client for example, you will not have to account for the VAT on any outstanding sales invoices until you have been paid. In fact, if you incur any bad debts, the VAT will never need to be paid to HMRC.

What is the disadvantage of using cash accounting?

There may be some disadvantages, depending on your situation.  For example, as you cannot reclaim the VAT on any purchases you make until payment is made, this could cause cashflow problems if you buy a substantial amount of stock on credit.

Joining the cash accounting scheme

You do not need to inform HMRC if you want to join the scheme. However, you must start at the beginning of a new VAT quarter.

You can also leave the scheme at the end of any VAT quarter, if necessary, or if your taxable turnover reaches the £1.6m mark.

If you would like any assistance on joining, leaving or any further information on the cash accounting scheme, then feel free to contact  the office on 0116 242 3400.

Tom Luckett,  Accounts & Tax 

Tax Event Due 31st October 2017

The following Tax Events are due on 31st October 2017:

Personal Tax Events

Deadline for submission of 2016/17 self assessment returns if you require HMRC to compute your tax liability and/or if tax underpaid is to be collected by adjustment to your 2018/19 PAYE code.

This deadline is only relevant for those individuals who complete a ‘paper’ self assessment tax return and who are employees. Where you have an underpayment you may request that HMRC collect the tax outstanding by making an adjustment to your tax code for the year 2018/19.

Please note that where your return is submitted online then the filing deadline for ‘coding out’ is 30 December 2017.

If we are already dealing with this matter on your behalf you need take no action.

Deadline for submitting ‘paper’ 2016/17 self assessment returns.

This deadline is relevant to individuals who need to complete a self assessment tax return for 2016/17 and wish to file the return in a ‘paper’ form. Self assessment returns submitted after this date must be submitted electronically.

Please note that this deadline is not relevant if we are going to submit an online return for you or you are going to deal with the completion of an online return yourself. The deadline for submission of online returns is 31 January 2018.

If we are already dealing with this matter on your behalf you need take no action.

If you would like to discuss any of this further or require some help please contact us 0116 2423400 or email info@torrwaterfield.co.uk

Applying for a Mortgage? SA302’s are no more. A Tax overview is what you need.

HMRC’s form SA302 is a tax calculation produced when you have filed your Self-Assessment Tax Return online.

It is a calculation for a particular tax year showing your income, your tax allowances, the amount of tax you’ve already paid and what tax, if any, you still owe or which should be repaid to you.

If your Tax Return has to be amended and it affects the tax payable, HMRC will send you a revised SA302 showing the up to date position for that particular year.

If you are asked to provide evidence of your income, for example if you’re applying for a mortgage, and you have been paying through self-assessment, you are likely to be asked for an SA302 for one or more tax years.  Another document you may also be asked to produce is a tax year overview.  This is a simple summary or statement of the tax due and tax you’ve paid during the tax year.

If you have filed your own tax return online, you can access your HMRC account and print off both the SA302 and tax year overview as required.

HMRC have been encouraging taxpayers to obtain a copy of the ‘Tax overview’ and ‘Full Calculation’ from the online service for some time and, from 4 September 2017, they have confirmed that they will no longer send paper SA302s to agents on behalf of their clients.

There are a number of lenders that will accept the tax overview and printed calculation in place of a paper SA302 and HMRC are working on educating other lenders to increase acceptance so that, once the SA302’s are no more, mortgage advisors will be happy with these documents instead.

If you don’t know where to start getting your tax year overview or tax calculation, most accountants, including torrwaterfield, use commercial software to produce tax returns for their clients.  This automatically generates a tax calculation which is roughly equivalent to a form SA302.  The majority of mortgage providers have agreed with HMRC to accept this Tax Calculation and the Tax Year Overview which your accountant can print off for you.

For a complete list of mortgage providers and lenders who accept Tax Year over views please click here. 

If you would like any assistance on this, then please contact the office on 0116 242 3400.

James Yarnall, Accounts & Tax 

More Personal Tax to pay in January 2018?

Throw back Thursday to this blog. It’s still very relevant! Get in touch if your affected.

No one wants to pay more tax, but from 6th April 2016, individuals who receive dividends will be taxed under new legislation. To explain how much this new measure could cost you we have created a short helpful video. 

Please visit our YouTube channel here to watch.  

Having viewed the video, if you would like to know how this will personally affect you in January 2018, please click here. 

Bob With TW.pngYouTube

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New Vehicle Tax Rates April 2017

We all know that there are a few things we need to consider before buying a new car.

These are some common questions which are asked by clients (hopefully before they go ahead and make that major purchase):

“Should I purchase a car through my business or should I use my own car for business use?”

“Should I lease or purchase a car?”

…and perhaps the most common question of all:

“How much tax will I have to pay?”

You may be interested in purchasing an electric car because you are concerned about the environment.  The government have certainly put in place tax incentives to encourage us to think ‘green’ and, with BMW recently deciding to build their future electric cars in the UK, it would seem that the motor industry is following suit.

Despite the many obvious things we all have to consider when purchasing a new car perhaps there is one thing that you may not be aware of and that is the new vehicle tax rates that were introduced from 1 April 2017.

The way vehicle tax is calculated has changed for cars and some motor homes that were first registered with DVLA from 1 April 2017.  The change doesn’t affect any vehicle registered before 1 April 2017.

The rates explained

Vehicle tax for the first year is based on CO2 emissions.  From 1 April 2017 this rate has increased and is now between £0 for electric cars and £2,000 for the highest polluting cars.  Vehicle tax rates can be checked by visiting https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables.

After the first year, the amount of tax that needs to be paid depends on the type of vehicle. The rates are:

  • £140 a year for petrol or diesel vehicles
  • £130 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bioethanol and LPG)
  • £0 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions (electric vehicles)

New vehicles with a list price of more than £40,000

If a vehicle has a list price (the published price before any discounts) of more than £40,000, the rate of tax is based on CO2 emissions for the first year.

After the first year, the rate depends on the type of vehicle (petrol, diesel, alternative fuel or zero emissions) as above plus an additional £310 a year for each of the next 5 years.

After those 5 years, the vehicle will then be taxed at one of the standard rates (£140, £130, or £0) depending on vehicle type.

So for vehicles with a list price of more than £40,000, from the second time they are taxed and for the next 5 years, the amount of tax to pay will be as follows:

  • £450 a year for petrol or diesel vehicles
  • £440 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bioethanol and LPG)
  • £310 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions (electric vehicles)

If you are considering the purchase of a new car and would like more information about the new vehicle tax rates then please click on the following Youtube video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbV7Yfud1dE

There are certain accounting and tax issues associated with business vehicles so please get in touch if you have any questions about a vehicle you wish to use in your business.  Remember it is always a good idea to ask for advice before making a major purchase as it is important to know all the facts before making a decision.

If you would like to discuss any of this further then please contact us 0116 2423400

Beth Judd, Accounts & Tax 

Tax Events are due on 19th October 2017

The following Tax Events are due on 19th October 2017:

Business Tax Events

PAYE quarterly payments are due for small employers for the pay periods 6th July 2017 to 5th October 2017.

This deadline is relevant to small employers only. As a small employer with income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions of less than £1,500 a month you are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions on a quarterly basis.

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 20th October 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Sunday 22nd October. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

PAYE, Student loan and CIS deductions are due for the month to 5th October 2017.

This deadline is relevant to employers who have made PAYE deductions from their employees’ salaries and to contractors who have paid subcontractors under the CIS.

Employers are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions. Contractors are required to make payment to HMRC of the tax deductions made from subcontractors under the CIS.  

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 20th October 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Sunday 22nd October. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

Tax and NI due under a 2016/17 PAYE Settlement Agreement.

This deadline is relevant for employers who have entered into a PAYE settlement agreement to pay tax and national insurance in respect of benefits in kind for their employees for the year ended 5th April 2017.

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 20th October 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Sunday 22nd October.

If you wish to discuss this further then please get in touch 0116 2423400

MATERNITY LEAVE AND PAY

I must admit that for most of my career to date I didn’t really think much about maternity leave and pay.  While training to be an accountant, just getting on with the job (apologies if that sounded a little like Theresa May!), it wasn’t really on my radar.  There did however come a point when I started thinking about it and realised that I didn’t really know anything about it, so here’s the basics:

Who is entitled to maternity leave?

 Any employee with an employment contract is entitled to maternity leave, no matter how long they have worked for their employer, as long as they give notice of the date they want to start their maternity leave at least 15 weeks before the baby is due.

How long is maternity leave?

Maternity leave is split into ‘Ordinary Maternity Leave’ and ‘Additional Maternity Leave’ which total 52 weeks.

All new mothers must take at least 2 weeks off after childbirth (or 4 weeks if they are a factory worker) but do not have to take the full 52 weeks.

 When does maternity leave start?

If there are no complications with the pregnancy, the employee can choose when to start maternity leave, but the earliest it can be started is 11 weeks before the expected week of childbirth (EWC).  If the baby is born early, leave starts the following day; it will also start automatically if the employee is off work for pregnancy-related illness in the 4 weeks before the EWC.

What about maternity pay?  Who is entitled to that?

To be entitled to Statutory Maternity Pay, the employee must be on the payroll in the ‘qualifying week’ (the 15th week before the EWC) and have worked for that employer for at least 26 weeks before that week.  In addition, they must provide proof of their pregnancy (a MATB1 form usually obtained from their midwife around the midpoint of the pregnancy) and earn at least £113 per week (gross) in the 8 weeks before the qualifying week.

Therefore not all those that are entitled to maternity leave will get maternity pay from their employer, but they may be able to get Maternity Allowance from the government instead. 

How much is maternity pay?

Statutory maternity pay is payable for up to 39 weeks as follows:

  • The first 6 weeks: 90% of the gross average weekly earnings (AWE)
  • The remaining (up to) 33 weeks: £140.98 or 90% of the AWE (whichever is lower)

So while maternity leave can be up to 52 weeks, statutory pay isn’t for that whole time.

Maternity pay is paid in the same way as wages, with tax and national insurance deducted.

Additional contractual maternity pay, over the minimum statutory amount, can also be paid and is common in some industries and the public sector (for example 6 months at full- or half-pay).

What about Dads?

As a Mum-to-be myself I have focused this blog on maternity aspects, but Dads have an entitlement too!  Dads are entitled to up to 2 consecutive weeks of leave but it can’t start before the birth and must finish within 56 days of the birth (or due date if the baby is early).  Statutory Paternity Pay (SPP) is paid at the lower of £140.98 per week or 90% of average weekly earnings.

Alternatively, a couple may choose “Shared Parental Leave” – our Payroll Manager, Becky Edwards wrote a blog earlier in the year specifically on this subject please click here to read this. 

Unpaid Parental Leave

 Many people don’t know that this exists!  Parents who have been with their employer for over a year can take unpaid time off to look after their child’s welfare, for example to spend more time with the child, settle them into nursery or look into schools.  It is available for a total of up 18 weeks per child, up to their 18th birthday.  It must be taken in whole weeks, at a maximum of 4 weeks at a time, unless the employer agrees otherwise.

Unpaid parental leave can be taken at any time (subject to giving 21 days notice) right from the birth of the child, so can be used in conjunction with maternity, paternity or shared parental leave.

The Employer Perspective

 Employment rights continue while an employee is on maternity leave, for example the right to employer pension contributions, returning to a job and paid holiday (which accrues while on maternity leave at the employee’s number of days worked prior to leave, even if they come back to work part-time).

You can reclaim at least 92% of SMP/SPP paid to employees – this increases to 103% if you qualify as a Small Employer (if you paid less than £45,000 in Class 1 National Insurance in the previous tax year).  The reclaim should be calculated by your payroll software and deducted from your PAYE/NI liability for the tax month, however if you can’t offset it in full you can ask for a repayment, but not until the start of the next tax year.

 Katie Kettle

Technical Manager (and Mum-to-be)Katie Kettle Colour