Applying for a Mortgage? SA302’s are no more. A Tax overview is what you need.

HMRC’s form SA302 is a tax calculation produced when you have filed your Self-Assessment Tax Return online.

It is a calculation for a particular tax year showing your income, your tax allowances, the amount of tax you’ve already paid and what tax, if any, you still owe or which should be repaid to you.

If your Tax Return has to be amended and it affects the tax payable, HMRC will send you a revised SA302 showing the up to date position for that particular year.

If you are asked to provide evidence of your income, for example if you’re applying for a mortgage, and you have been paying through self-assessment, you are likely to be asked for an SA302 for one or more tax years.  Another document you may also be asked to produce is a tax year overview.  This is a simple summary or statement of the tax due and tax you’ve paid during the tax year.

If you have filed your own tax return online, you can access your HMRC account and print off both the SA302 and tax year overview as required.

HMRC have been encouraging taxpayers to obtain a copy of the ‘Tax overview’ and ‘Full Calculation’ from the online service for some time and, from 4 September 2017, they have confirmed that they will no longer send paper SA302s to agents on behalf of their clients.

There are a number of lenders that will accept the tax overview and printed calculation in place of a paper SA302 and HMRC are working on educating other lenders to increase acceptance so that, once the SA302’s are no more, mortgage advisors will be happy with these documents instead.

If you don’t know where to start getting your tax year overview or tax calculation, most accountants, including torrwaterfield, use commercial software to produce tax returns for their clients.  This automatically generates a tax calculation which is roughly equivalent to a form SA302.  The majority of mortgage providers have agreed with HMRC to accept this Tax Calculation and the Tax Year Overview which your accountant can print off for you.

For a complete list of mortgage providers and lenders who accept Tax Year over views please click here. 

If you would like any assistance on this, then please contact the office on 0116 242 3400.

James Yarnall, Accounts & Tax 

Thinking of an Upgrade?

If the seemingly endless adverts are to be believed then if you subscribe to online bookkeeping software such as QuickBooks or Xero then your bookkeeping will become effortless, will probably be done in a coffee shop or on the go and will leave your accountant kissing an iPad with glee.

Whilst new software isn’t going to change your life, there is a lot to be said for having access to your records from any laptop/tablet/phone and from anywhere with a decent internet connection.

Online bookkeeping software allows you to send invoices and quotes to potential customers from your phone, enter purchase invoices from the sofa and even have bank transactions feed directly from your bank into the software to reduce the time taken to reconcile your bank.

The software can often be used by multiple users simultaneously, are compatible with Windows, Apple & Android operating systems and have a range of add-ons to allow data to be linked with third party software such as GoCardless or iZettle.

Cloud based software is constantly backed-up and saved by the software provider, and you can grant us direct access so there is no more need for taking and sending over backups. The software is constantly updated too so there’s no need to upgrade every few years.

If you’d like to discuss the packages available for your bookkeeping needs, or if you’re a Sage user and looking to upgrade to one of their subscription based products, please contact us and we can find the best option for you – we might even be able to obtain a lower subscription cost compared to going direct.

 

Matt Smith, Accounts Audit & Tax  

0116 24243400

The Right to work in the UK

Do you know how to carry out a ‘right to work in the UK check?

The Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 places a duty on employers to carry out checks to confirm someone’s right to work in the UK before employing them.

Punishments for employing an illegal worker are:

  • £20,000 for each illegal worker employed
  • Up to five years imprisonment for knowingly employing an illegal worker

Some employers may not know the specific checks and check-ups that must be used when employing a new worker:

The ‘Right to work Check’

Employers must carry out a ‘Right to work check’ on a worker before the employment begins to ensure that he or she is legally allowed to work in the UK and do the work in question. This check should be carried out on all employees to maintain accuracy and avoid any discrimination.

The ‘Right to work check’ means that an employer must check that a document, provided by the worker, is acceptable for showing the employee’s permission to work in the UK. There are three key steps to determine the check:

  1. Obtain the original version of one or more of the permitted documents
  2. Check the validity in the presence of the holder (worker)
  3. Take and retain a clear copy of the document in an un-editable format, e.g. PDF / JPEG, and record the date of the check.

These copies must be kept until 2 years after the employment ends.

List A and List B

HMRC provides two lists that show the documents required to prove a worker has the right to work in the UK. List A gives the documents that show the holder has an ongoing right to work in the UK. If an employer checks these correctly, they have an excuse against payment of a civil fine for the duration of that person’s employment.

Alternatively, List B gives documents that show the holder has the right to work in the UK for a limited time only. If an employer checks these correctly, they have an excuse against a civil penalty for a limited time. To retain a statutory excuse, another check must be carried out towards the end of this period.

HMRC’s employers guide to acceptable right to work documents explains list A and list B:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/acceptable-right-to-work-documents-an-employers-guide

HMRC also provide an online interactive tool on checking somebodies right to work in the UK. This should be used when carrying out the checking of documents, if extra clarification is needed:

If you have any questions on the above or would like any more information, please feel free to contact us on 0116 2423400.

Zahra Bates, Payroll Assistant 

Tax Calendar

The following Tax Events are due on 19th July 2017:

Business Tax Events

PAYE quarterly payments are due for small employers for the pay periods 6th April 2017 to 5th July 2017.

This deadline is relevant to small employers and contractors only. As a small employer with income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions of less than £1,500 a month you are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions on a quarterly basis.

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 21st July 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Saturday 22nd July. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

PAYE Student loan and CIS deductions due for the month to 5th July 2017.

This deadline is relevant to employers who have made PAYE deductions from their employees’ salaries and to contractors who have paid subcontractors under the CIS.

Employers are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions. Contractors are required to make payment to HMRC of the tax deductions made from subcontractors under the CIS.  

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 21st July 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Saturday 22nd July. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

Class 1A NIC due for 2016/17.

This deadline is relevant for employers who have provided their employees with benefits for 2016/17. These benefits should have been reported by the 6th July and the amount of the Class 1A employer only NI liability due calculated on the form P11D(b).

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 21st July 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Saturday 22nd July. Interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties may also apply. 

We have a Tax Calendar on our website so you never miss a deadline to see future deadlines please visit our calendar  https://www.torrwaterfield.co.uk/resources/tax-calendar 

When Do I Have To Register for VAT?

If you are aware of an increase in turnover, or are unsure about whether you should be VAT registered or not, the following points should help:                                                      

  • If your turnover exceeds the registration threshold of £85,000 over a rolling 12 month period then you will need to register for VAT; you will then need to calculate at what point your turnover broke this threshold.
  • Once you know when you exceeded the registration threshold, you need to register by the end of the following month. For example, if the threshold was breached on 31 August, you have to register by 30 September and will be registered from 1 October.
  • If you expect you will breach the registration threshold in a single 30 day period, you must register for VAT immediately.
  • If you are late registering for VAT, then you must pay what you owe from the point at which you should have registered; as well as interest there may be penalties which depend on what you owe and how late your registration is.
  • It is possible to get an exception from registering if your turnover goes over the threshold temporarily. To do this you need to write to HMRC with evidence as to why you believe your net turnover won’t go over £83,000 (de-registration threshold) in the next 12 months. HMRC will then respond confirming whether an exception has been granted or not – this is not always guaranteed – and if denied, they will register you for VAT.
  • You can also register at any point voluntarily – you must pay HMRC any VAT you owe from the date that you become registered.

If you are unsure, there is a helpful link online (www.gov.uk/vat-registration/overview) which explains in further detail the steps you should take when registering for VAT.

If you have any queries or concerns with regards to any aspect of VAT, feel free to give our office a ring on 0116 242 3400 and we will be happy to discuss this with you. 

Jake Dempsey, Accounts & Tax

Have you paid your self-assessment bill?

Tax Payments – How late can you be?

With the madness of the January tax return deadline, it may have slipped some of your minds to actually pay your self-assessment bill. If this is the case then you may be wondering how you will be penalised for doing so.

For those that have filed their self-assessment tax return before the deadline but have not paid the bill, there will be interest accruing at 2.75% pa for the first 30 days.

However, after 30 days from the deadline the full amount of tax due will be subject to a 5% penalty. This means that if you had a liability of £5,000 unpaid by midnight on 2 March 2017, there would be an immediate fine of £250 added to your account.

Similarly, if after 6 and 12 months from the filing deadline you have not paid the full balance, then there would be additional 5% penalties on the tax outstanding at those dates.

Furthering the example above, should there still be an outstanding debt of £5,000 on 1 August 2017 then an additional £250 penalty will be accrued and if the debt has still not been settled by 1 February 2018 then another £250 will be added. This means that within just 12 months, a £5,000 tax bill will have penalties totaling £750.

On top of this there will also still be interest accruing on both the tax and penalties. Making the estimated amount owing on 1 February 2018 £5,887.

Sam Jefferson, Accounts & Tax 

If you need further help please contact us.

Childcare and employer provided childcare vouchers.

Are you a working parent with a child entered into child care?

You could benefit from a cash saving scheme that wochildcare-blocks-1-thumb-2.pngrks with childcare providers………………

Childcare vouchers are a government approved benefit for all eligible working parents.

These are a tax efficient way of paying for childcare that won’t cost you anything to join.

Most childcare providers will accept childcare vouchers towards payment for your childcare costs.

Childcare vouchers can be claimed by either or both parents for children up to the age of 16.

You can exchange up to £55.00 per week, or £243.00 per month, of your gross salary depending on when you have joined the scheme and how much you earn. 

As an employer here at Torr Waterfield we run a childcare voucher scheme that assists all our working parents with children in childcare.

Not only does this help our employees with the costs but also saves the company in National Insurance costs.

Speak to your employer now and see if you are eligible….

How we can help

If your business is located in the Leicester area and you would like to discuss setting up an employer supported childcare scheme in further detail, please do not hesitate to contact us.

We also have lots more info on our website please click here  

Sarah Knight, Bookkeeping 

The importance of keeping your company statutory books up to date.

What are company statutory books?

Statutory books are records about your limited company which are legally required to be kept and safely stored. The relevant documents are usually kept in a bound book or a ring binder.

Alternatively, they can also be held in electronic format providing that you are readily able to obtain hard copies of some documents if required to do so.

Some companies may find this more practical but to avoid any problems, Torr Waterfield keeps the original, physical copy and also a scanned copy of the documents if we are your Registered Office.

Every UK Company is required by law to have a set of statutory books and to maintain/adjust them accordingly. 

What should be stored in them?

These are just a few of the documents which are usually kept in the company statutory books, there are other relevant documents which should be stored, but the list would be too long if I was to write them all! – So here is a basic list of both compulsory and recommended documents to store:

  • The certificate of incorporation
  • The memorandum and articles of association
  • Any share certificates and stock transfer forms
  • Any minutes of meetings
  • Register of members (compulsory)
  • Register of directors (compulsory)
  • Register of secretaries (compulsory)
  • Directors and secretaries residential addresses (compulsory)
  • Company address or company name changes

Because you are required by law to have statutory books, it is extremely important that the records are kept up to date and adjusted where necessary.

How long should you keep them for?

The statutory books should be kept from the date of incorporation until the cessation of the company – This means even dormant companies should continue to maintain them.

The minutes of meetings and resolutions must be kept for at least 10 years from the date of the meeting to which they relate.

Where are they stored?

The statutory books are usually stored at the Registered Office address. However, they are also commonly stored at the companies SAIL address (Single Alternative Inspection Location).

Who can view them?

Any member of the public has a right to request an observation of the company’s statutory books (with a notice period of 2 to 10 working days, depending on the circumstances) if they provide a reasonable explanation for doing so. This will involve stating the following before allowing access:

  • Name and address of person, company or organisation making the request
  • Purpose of inspection
  • Who the information will be given to
  • How the information will be used

Of course, the statutory books should also be available for inspection by HMRC and Companies House. This can be any time between 9:00am and 3:00pm every working day.

In reality, it is rare that requests are made to view the statutory books of a company. Information that would be kept relating to any given company is available from Companies House either electronically or through the post for a small fee.

So why is maintaining the company statutory books so important?

HMRC guidance states that “If you do not keep adequate records or you do not keep your records for the required period of time, you may have to pay a penalty.”

If during HMRC’s visit they find that the records are not kept to an adequate standard they will give you the chance to update them before they come for a second visit.

If the records are still deemed as inadequate, it means that you could ultimately receive a fine of up to £3,000 – Even for small companies!

What if my company statutory books are missing?

It is not unusual for clients to admit to not being aware of the company statutory books whereabouts – it is however possible for them to be reconstructed.

One of our services for clients is to act as the Registered Office for their company, if requested to do so – which also involves storing and updating the company statutory books and filing the Annual Return. For more information on this, please contact us so we can help!

Amy Fisher, Administration _DSC1514.JPG

‘Spring’ your business forward with a fresh look at book-keeping

Staying on top of the book-keeping is often an overlooked part of business, with a mad rush around deadline time to get everything up to date.  However, in order to better understand your business and ensure you are maintaining a healthy profit margin, keeping on top of your records is key.

We recommend you therefore do the following on a monthly basis:

  • Reconcile your bank accounts.

Ensure that the balance you have on your records agrees to your bank statements – if not, have a look to see if you’ve missed any expenses or receipts.  Remember – you need to record every transaction, even if it is not business related, and just indicate that it is private in your books.

  • Review your creditor lists.

Check your records of suppliers you currently owe money to.  Any outstanding invoices can then be paid either within the credit terms or earlier, potentially receiving an early settlement discount, if offered.  You will also be able to check for payments you have made up front, and are yet to receive an invoice for.  Chase it up now while this is fresh in your mind.

  • Review your debtor lists.

Cash is king in business, so it’s important to regularly review who owes you money, and chase it in as soon as the invoice is due.  This will also prompt you to keep on top of your invoicing.  The sooner the customer is invoiced, the sooner they will pay!

Book-keeping is not always everybody’s cup of tea, so if you feel you need extra support with yours, or would like some training on the best way to monitor your business, please feel free to give us a call.

Holly Makinson.

Accounts, Audit & Tax 

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