We Did It – 2018 Charity Challenge, The Plod

This year’s challenge was a 40 mile walk around Rutland. We started at around 10pm on Saturday and continued through the night, finishing at 3pm on Sunday afternoon.  This works out as 18 hours allowing for the clocks going back which was fortunate as we had another hour to walk!

The walk really was a challenge and, of the 17 who started, 11 finished the entire 40 miles.

We were walking for the majority of the time besides the two well deserved pub stops, a breakfast stop and a few 5 minute breaks.

It was an experience to say the least and I did enjoy the walk besides the dark, cold, wind, rain and taking very unnecessary detours over muddy fields!

An amazing breakfast was provided by John and Ingrid Ferry which the team at Torr Waterfield are very grateful for.

This was definitely our toughest challenge to date.

We would like to thank everybody that has supported and sponsored us. The walk has raised jut over £7,500 so far for the charity Coping With Cancer.

There is still time to donate. It would be incredible if you could show some support for the team and make a donation small or large, it’s all for a great cause. Please please visit our total giving page www.totalgiving.co.uk/mypage/torrwaterrutland18

Thanks from all the Team.

There are lots of photos from the walk on our Facebook page but here are a few of our favourites.

 

Training has now started for the Rutland Plod

As you may well know we are planning to walk 40 miles around Rutland water and surrounding villages, starting at 10pm on Saturday 27th October and finishing hopefully at 3pm Sunday afternoon. Please read our previous blog for more info here. 

Last weekend I plotted a 15 mile practice walk around Charnwood ,including Bradgate Park, Beacon Hill and Bardon Hill.  According to Heather’s app, the actual distance was 17 and a quarter miles.

It was a lovely sunny day for walking, so of course we stopped half way in a beer garden to refuel.

The 17 (and a quarter) miles took 7 hours (including the pub stop).  So by my calculations, the 40 mile challenge will take about 16 hours… great!

I have to say, when we got back to the Bradgate Park carpark, the thought of going round again (and a bit further) sounded like a stupid idea.

But hopefully with a bit more training over the next 3 weeks, we will all get round and raise lots of money for Coping with Cancer, our charity of the year.

Please help us reach our target and sponsor us. No matter how small or large you can do so by donating on our total giving page https://www.totalgiving.co.uk/mypage/torrwaterrutland18

Stuart Caney, Challenge Leader

The Rutland Plod – TW Challenge 2018

Last year the team, friends and family took part in a 2 day challenge, walking 23 miles per day along The Llyn Peninsula. This year we are challenging ourselves even further by trekking 40 miles around Rutland overnight. This means no time to rest as the team begins the challenge at 10pm on Saturday 27 October and will continue non-stop (except for a few pub breaks!) through into the late afternoon of Sunday 28 October, taking a total of 16 to 18 hours to complete.

After parking our cars Mike Waterfield and Stu Caney will lead the team along the south end of Rutland Water before walking up the west side. This will be a good starting point as it will prevent the group from getting lost in the dark as Rutland Water will be on our right hand side for a couple of hours (around 6 miles).

Shortly after midnight and a short break to recharge, we will cross over the River Gwash, pass through Braunston in Rutland and then make our way south whilst the sun rises. The clocks will have gone back by this point which means we have an early finish! Matt Smith and other members of Torr Waterfield will be meeting us once we reach Morcott at around 9am, when we will then follow the River Welland from Barrowden after breakfast for 6 miles. This will lead us to the built up village of Ketton where we can stop for a bite to eat at around 1pm before eventually getting back to the starting point for 3pm.

We will also be meeting a few others in Ketton who were not able to join us for the whole 40 miles. They will be walking the last 5 miles with us and celebrating the success of completing the challenge!

For any long distance walking challenge there is only one form of training that will ensure you perform well – walking! So in the lead up to the challenge we will be doing a number of training walks to ensure we can endure the whole 40 miles! Our first training walk was last Saturday starting from Bradgate Park and walking 15 miles which took around 6 hours.

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Over the coming weeks we will be posting other blogs to keep you updated on how our training is going and once we complete the challenge we will let you know how tough it was and how much money we raised in total.

The money we raise will be donated to our charity of the year, Coping with Cancer. To find out more about them you can look at our previous blog https://torrwaterfield.wordpress.com/2018/02/28/our-charity-of-the-year-coping-with-cancer/ or visit their website https://www.c-w-c.org.uk/ 

If you would like to show support and sponsor us no matter how small or large you can do so by donating on our just giving page www.totalgiving.co.uk/mypage/torrwaterrutland18    

Amy Fisher, Fundraising Lead – 0116 2423400

Our Charity of the year – Coping with Cancer

Each year at Torr Waterfield we choose a charity, local or national, to represent and raise money for. 

This year we have chosen to support Coping with Cancer.  The charity provided much needed emotional and physical support for a very close friend of Denise Burley who is a senior member of our team; hence the link to Coping with Cancer.  The friend has a young family and was determined to make such a difficult time as normal as possible.  She cannot praise the counselling team highly enough for their therapy sessions nor for the complementary therapies which made her feel like a person again instead of a cancer patient.  It is often the smaller charities that get overlooked but they provide practical help on your doorstep and even the smallest of donations can make a big difference.  Denise explained this to the team at Torr Waterfield and they were eager to do as much as they can to help.

Over the course of the next year we will raise money through a variety of activities such as dress down days, staff cake sales and planned events.  In May we will run our annual Torr Waterfield Karting Cup where 12 teams of 4 compete in a two hour endurance race.  September is when we have our ‘Walking challenge’ where our team, friends and family take part in an organised walk.  These aren’t just walks in the park!  We have previously walked 48 miles in two days around the Lyn peninsula in Wales & on another occasion completed the National Three Peaks in just 48 hours.

We look forward to working with Coping with Cancer over the next year and raising as much money as we can for this fantastic charity. To find out more what Coping with Cancer do and upcoming events please visit their website https://www.c-w-c.org.uk/ 

Mike Waterfield, Director 

0116 2423400 info@torrwaterfield.co.uk 

Charity law changes

Since 2 January 2013 new charities have been able to register as a Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO).

Prior to that date the only way to be an incorporated charity was to form a limited company, registered at Companies House, and then apply for charity registration with the Charity Commission.  This approach meaning that there were two sets of laws to comply with and two separate annual filings.

The CIO is registered solely with the Charity Commission and subject to charity law only.

This was a long-awaited and very welcome change to the law.

There was however one sticking point and that was for a charity that had already registered as a limited company and now wanted to benefit from the updated legislation.  The only way forward was to set up a new CIO and transfer the old charity over.

New legislation was published on 23 November allowing charitable companies, in England and Wales, to convert to CIOs.  There will be a phased implementation: Charities with income below £12,500 will be able to apply from 1 January 2018 and those with income greater than £500,000 from 1 August 2018.  There are four other income bands that fit in to the intervening period.

It has been stated in official releases that the process should be “simple and straightforward in most cases”.  The charity will need to adopt a new CIO constitution and pass a Special resolution to convert.

It appears that procedures have been put in place for the Charity Commission and Companies House to liaise with each other so that the date of conversion is consistent between both regulators.

If you wish to discuss this further then please get in touch on 0116 2423400

Neil Ford, Technical Manager

The Apprenticeship Levy

The Apprenticeship Levy is charged on employers’ “paybills” at a rate of 0.5%. The levy is payable through Pay as You Earn (PAYE) and is payable alongside income tax and National Insurance. To keep the process as simple as possible “paybill” will be based on total employee earnings subject to Class 1 secondary NICs.

Each employer receives one annual allowance of £15,000 to offset against their levy payment. There is a connected persons rule, similar to the Employment Allowance connected persons rule, so employers who operate multiple payrolls are only be able to claim one allowance.

1.) If you’re an employer with a pay bill over £3 million each year, you must pay the apprenticeship levy from 6 April 2017. You can find out how to do this here.

You will report and pay your levy to HMRC through the PAYE process.

The levy will not affect the way you fund training for apprentices who started an apprenticeship programme before 1 May 2017. You’ll need to carry on funding training for these apprentices under the terms and conditions that were in place at the time the apprenticeship started.

Detail on how to setup and use your online account can be found here.

2.) If you do not have to pay the levy then you can still receive support to pay your apprentices.

From May 2017, you will pay 10% towards to the cost of apprenticeship training and government will pay the rest (90%), up to the funding band maximum.

If you do not pay the levy, you won’t be able to use the apprenticeship service to pay for apprenticeship training and assessment until at least 2018.

Instead, you’ll need to agree a payment schedule with the provider and pay them directly for the training. The provider must prove that you have paid your contributions as a condition of government paying its contribution.

There are 2 different types of apprenticeships to choose from:

  • apprenticeship standards– each standard covers a specific occupation and sets out the core skills, knowledge and behaviours an apprentice will need; they are developed by employer groups known as ‘trailblazers’
  • apprenticeship frameworks– a series of work-related vocational and professional qualifications, with workplace- and classroom-based training

To choose training:

If you would like to discuss any of this further then please contact us on 0116 2423400

Becky Edwards, Payroll Manager 

Torr Waterfield’s 2017 charity of the year – Alzheimer’s Society

Every year we support a different charity and this year it is the Alzheimer’s Society.

I think most of us know friends or family that have been affected by dementia. Currently around 850,000 people in the UK have been diagnosed and of those, 42,000 are under 65. This total is predicted to rise to over 1,000,000 by 2021. Living with dementia has huge emotional, social, psychological and practical impacts on not only the sufferer but also on their family; one of the saddest things a person can do is watch their loved one become upset as they “disappear”.

The vast majority of causes at present cannot be cured, although there are some drug treatments available which may help slow down the symptoms. However with care and support someone who has been diagnosed with dementia can live well. The Alzheimer’s Society aims to raise £1 billion over the next 10 years in order to achieve their 3 main goals:-

Support and advice service– in whatever way is needed either face- to-face, telephone or online advice and by 2022 to reach out to everyone at time of diagnosis.

Increase public awareness – so that people with dementia are treated as equal members of society, ending the stigma associated with the condition.

Research – investing in the UK’s first dedicated Dementia Research Institute as well as in biomedical, prevention, assistive technology and care research.

So we want to help by raising as much money as we can and there will be lots of opportunities to help us support this national charity throughout the year – more details to follow later.

If you would like to know more please visit www.alzheimers.org.uk

Denise Burley, Accounts & Tax In_aid_of_Alzheimers_logo.jpg

Time for new change

As you may or may not be aware The Royal Mint has revealed that a new issue of the £1 coin is to take place and is set to be released on 28th March 2017.

So why change?

Approximately 1 in 30 £1 coins are counterfeit – this in itself is a fairly high amount.

However, when you put this ratio into the estimated amount of £1 coins in circulation it is staggering.

As of March 2014, The Royal Mint estimated that there were 1,553,000,000 £1 coins in circulation of which 3.04% were counterfeit – meaning that there is around £47,211,200 of counterfeit £1 coins in circulation. The new coin should be considerably more difficult to attempt to fake due to a number of new features.

What are the features?

12-sides – New distinctive shape – making it instantly recognisable.

Bimetallic – it is made of two metals. The outer ring is gold coloured (nickel-brass) and the inner ring is silver coloured (nickel-plated alloy).

Latent image – it has an image like a hologram that changes from a ‘£’ symbol to the number ‘1’ when the coin is seen from different angles.

Micro-lettering – it has very small lettering on the lower inside rim on both sides of the coin. One pound on the obverse “heads” side and the year of production on the reverse “tails” side, for example 2016 or 2017.

Milled edges – it has grooves on alternate sides.

Hidden high security feature – a high security feature has been in built into the coin to protect it from counterfeiting in the future.

When will this happen?

The new coins will be introduced on 28th March 2017 leading to a co-circulation period where both old and new coins will be accepted. On 16th October 2017 a demonetisation period will begin where the old £1 coins are under no obligation to be accepted and should not be redistributed – they can however be deposited into most high street banks.

How can it affect my Business?

If you have a cash handling business then you need to ensure all machines that accept pound coins are compatible with the new design and if not, then your machinery supplier needs to be contacted as a matter of urgency. Once October 2017 comes around you have the right to refuse the old style one pound coins as this is the beginning of the demonetisation period. As mentioned above, once this time comes, do not worry, as the old style pound coins can be deposited into most high street banks for a significant period of time.

The pound won’t be round for much longer…

If you would like to discuss this more please contact us 0116 2423400

Brook Lucas, Accounts & Tax 

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Charities and Fundraising – New changes

The Fundraising Regulator fundraisingregulator.org.uk was established a year ago to oversee charity fundraising in England and Wales.  There are different rules for charities registered in Scotland.

The new body assumed responsibility for this area on 7 July 2016.

So far most people are unaware of its existence, but that should change as we proceed into 2017.  Generally the Code of Fundraising Practice will affect charities and anyone involved in their management.  The general public should however be aware of the new rules and there are schemes being drawn up to protect people from over eager charities.

The biggest effect on charities is that the Fundraising Regulator will be funded by a voluntary levy.  Charities with spending of over £100,000 on fundraising will be asked to pay between £150 and £15,000 annually, this being on a sliding scale with the top end only being relevant for a small number of very large charities; exempt charities will be charged a flat rate of £1,000.

Below the £100,000 threshold, a charity may choose to register and pay just £50.

Third party fundraising agencies and similar organisations may also sign up and pay between £100 and £1,200 annually.

Although, as already stated, this is a voluntary levy, it is important for charities to consider the message they are giving out by not being registered.  It may well influence potential donors if they feel that the charity is not abiding by the Code.  The government has also retained powers within the legislation to make the levy compulsory if the voluntary approach does not work!

Finally, the Regulator is working on a Fundraising Preference Service which should be launched this year.  This will enable individuals to register and then have control over how, or whether, charities contact them for fundraising purposes.  This is expected to work in a similar fashion to the existing Telephone Preference Service and the Mail Preference Service.

There is of course much more detail behind all of this and we will be happy to help. Please get in touch if you would like to discuss this further 0116 2423400

Neil Ford, Technical Manager Neil Ford April 2012