14 Days left to submit your 2016/17 self assessment return

The following Tax Events are due on 31st January 2018:

Personal Tax Events

Deadline for submitting your 2016/17 self assessment return (£100 automatic penalty if your return is late) and the balance of your 2016/17 liability together with the first payment on account for 2017/18 are also due.

This deadline is relevant to individuals who need to complete a self assessment tax return and make direct payments to HMRC in respect of their income tax, Classes 2 and 4 NI, capital gains tax and High Income Child Benefit Charge liabilities. 

There is a penalty of £100 if your return is not submitted on time, even if there is no tax due or your return shows that you are due a tax refund.

The balance of any outstanding income tax, Classes 2 and 4 NI, capital gains tax and High Income Child Benefit Charge for the year ended 5th April 2017 is due for payment by 31st January 2018.  Where the payment is made late interest will be charged.

The first payment on account for 2017/18 in respect of income tax and any Class 4 NI or High Income Child Benefit Charge is also due for payment by 31st January 2018.

If we have already dealt with your self assessment return on your behalf you need take no action.

If you haven’t completed your self assessment return yet please contact us, we can help. 0116 2423400 or send us an email info@torrwaterfield.co.uk

When is a van not a van?

It’s not important whether the vehicle is a van. What’s important is that it’s not a car.

For VAT purposes it will be a car if:

It is of a kind normally used on public roads, has three or more wheels and either:

  • is constructed or adapted for carrying passengers; or
  • has roofed and windowed accommodation behind the driver.

Excluding:

  • Vehicles capable of accommodating only one person;
  • Vehicles with a gross weight of at least three tonnes;
  • Vehicles with a payload of at least one tonne;
  • Minibuses (for 12 or more people);
  • Caravans;
  • Ambulances, prison vans and other special purpose vehicles.

For P11D/capital allowances purposes it will be a car if:

It is a mechanically propelled road vehicle, which is not:

  • a goods vehicle (of a construction primarily suited to the conveyance of goods or burden of any description);
  • a motorcycle (fewer than four wheels and an unladen weight of no more than 425Kg);
  • an invalid carriage (specifically designed for disabled use and an unladen weight of no more than 254Kg); or
  • a vehicle of a type not commonly used as a private vehicle and unsuitable for such use.

People (at least living ones) aren’t goods or a ‘burden of any description’, so anything with seats in the back (other than a double cab pick-up type vehicle with a one tonne+ payload) is likely to be regarded as a car for direct tax purposes.

Anything with seats in the back and/or roofed and windowed accommodation behind the driver (other than a double cab pickup with a one tonne+ payload) is likely to also be a car for VAT purposes.

For clarification use the link below.

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/manuals/eimanual/eim23110.html  

If you would like to discuss any of this further then please contact us 0116 2423400

Linda Plumb, Credit Control

 

Tax Events are due on 19th January 2018

The following Tax Events are due on 19th January 2018:

Business Tax Events

PAYE quarterly payments are due for small employers for the pay periods 6th October 2017 to 5th January 2018

This deadline is relevant to small employers and contractors only. As a small employer with income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions of less than £1,500 a month you are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions on a quarterly basis.

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is 22nd January 2018. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

PAYE, Student loan and CIS deductions are due for the month to 5th January 2018.

This deadline is relevant to employers who have made PAYE deductions from their employees’ salaries and to contractors who have paid subcontractors under the CIS.

Employers are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions. Contractors are required to make payment to HMRC of the tax deductions made from subcontractors under the CIS.  

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is 22nd January 2018. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

Why do I need to keep my bookkeeping up to date?

Happy New Year! This is the 1st post of the year & hopefully it will help you to start thinking about how to organise your business over the next 12 months. 

As we are all aware, Making Tax Digital is fast approaching meaning you need to have bookkeeping software in place for your business that you like! 

It may take quite some time to find bookkeeping software that you get along with and understand. There are many out there including: Xero, Sage One and Iris Kashflow.

Keeping your bookkeeping up to date can be good for many reasons:

  • You can have an up to date profit and loss account to see how your business is doing and compare it to other periods
  • Review your VAT return to look at liabilities
  • You can make your own sales invoices on most bookkeeping software which can save a lot of time
  • You can also keep track of your creditors and debtors which will lead to better cash control and more reliable forecasting

In my experience the bookkeeping software that I have personally found best, and clients who have no bookkeeping experience have seemed to like the most, is Xero. This is for many reasons, some of them being the following:

  • Bank feeds – We all know that typing up your bank can be very time consuming and then you come to reconcile it you’re 1p out! This is why I love bank feeds. Everything is pulled through from your online banking, meaning you do not need to worry about that 1p; all you have to do is match the bank receipts against sales invoices and payments to purchase invoices. Xero also has the function of ‘rules’ meaning if you have a standing order set up for example £25.00 to Vodafone every month, you can create a rule to routinely post this bank payment to telephone expenses with the specified VAT treatment.

 

  • Submitting your VAT return online. Once you are happy with your VAT return on Xero you can ‘File it now’ meaning you just need to put your government gateway login information on to Xero and it will be submitted for you – unfortunately you still have to make the payment to HMRC!

 

  • Paperless record keeping – How many of us have an office full of the past 6 years of records? Everyone I’m hoping! This is a really handy feature with Xero, especially if you like a tidy office.  With Xero you can attach a pdf copy of the invoice online meaning there will always be a copy of that invoice and you will not have to keep a paper version of it.

 

If you are looking into starting your bookkeeping with online software and would like some advice on which one is best for your specific  needs, or would like some training, please get in touch with us on 0116 242 3400.

Georginda Hare, Bookkeeper 

VAT: Overseas sales

VAT: Overseas sales

Below are some very basic rules of how to deal with VAT on overseas sales. If you ever come across these, please contact us as there are a lot more details which should be reviewed before anything is submitted to HMRC.

The following are basic questions that need to be answered before being able to decide whether VAT should be charged or not:

Are you supplying goods or services?

Are you supplying to a business or a consumer?

Where are they located?

Are they VAT registered?

Goods

EU:

VAT Registered Business-

If the VAT number has been provided by the Business and there is a VAT number on the invoice as well as documentary proof of export, VAT can be charged at 0%.

Non-VAT Registered Business or Consumer-

If the customer is not VAT registered you will have to charge VAT at 20%. However this is only true until the distance selling threshold is exceeded, which depends on the country concerned.

 Outside the EU:

If the Customer resides outside the EU, VAT can be charged at 0%.

 Services

EU:

All VAT and Non-VAT Registered Businesses-

VAT can be charged at 0%, if the service is for business purposes.

Consumer-

VAT must be charged at 20%.

However, if it is an ‘e-service’ you would have to charge VAT at that country’s own rate.

Outside the EU:

All VAT and Non-VAT Registered Businesses-

VAT can be charged at 0%.

Consumer-

VAT can be charged at 0% for the following services:

Electronically supplied services

Advertising

Legal

Accountancy

Consultancy

Supply of staff

Hire of goods

Telecoms and broadcasting

 

VAT must be charged at 20% on all other services.

If you have any queries, or require any further information on this, please do not hesitate to contact us 0116 2423400

Jess Cooper, Accounts & Tax 

Are you ready for GDPR? 25 May 2018

As of 25 May 2018 the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will be enforced on organisations that process personal data of EU residents. Although very similar to the current Data Protection Act, the GDPR will strengthen the current data protection requirements by introducing a number of key changes for organisations. Some of these changes include:

  • The definition of personal data being broader
  • Consent will be necessary for processing children’s data
  • The rules for obtaining valid consent have been changed
  • The appointment of a data protection officer (DPO) will be mandatory for certain businesses
  • There are new restrictions on international data transfers
  • Data subjects have the right to be forgotten

For more information on the GDPR’s key changes you can visit:

https://www.itgovernance.co.uk/data-protection-dpa-and-eu-data-protection-regulation

Some things to consider when preparing to become GDPR compliant are:

  1. Are key decision makers and key people in your organisation aware that the law is changing to the GDPR?
  2. Is a record kept of the personal information you hold, and a log of where it came from and who it is shared with?
  3. Do your procedures in processing personal data comply with the individuals rights? (how you delete personal data or provide data to others)
  4. If someone requests personal information, are procedures in place to ensure data protection is upheld?
  5. Do you seek, obtain and record consent you gain from clients?
  6. Do you have an assigned Data Protection Officer?
  7. Do your current procedures in place enable you to detect, report and investigate a personal data breach?

 There is plenty of time to decide what type of risk assessments need to be carried out to ensure compliance with the new regulation is upheld but organisations should start to act as soon as possible as the maximum penalties for non-compliance under the GDPR will increase significantly – from £500,000 to the greater of €20,000,000 or 4% of an organisation’s global turnover.

For more information you can visit our website https://www.torrwaterfield.co.uk/news/latest-news-for-business/archive/news-article/2017/september/get-ready-for-the-new-data-protection-rules 

If you wish to discuss this further then please get in touch 0116 2423400

Amy Fisher, Reception & Administrator 

Autumn Budget 2017

Yesterday saw a budget that focused, as expected, on housing and a stormy economic forecast. Our full summary is available on our website, but the key tax developments are summarised below.

Personal Tax Rates and Allowances

The personal allowance is currently £11,500 and will increase to £11,850 in April 2018. The higher rate threshold similarly increases from £45,000 to £46,350. Phillip Hammond reaffirmed his commitment to raise these thresholds to £12,500 and £50,000 respectively by 2020.

 National Insurance for the self-employed

 After the embarrassment of Mr Hammond’s U-turn earlier this year after attempting to abolish Class 2 National Insurance and increase Class 4, it was announced that in order to give sufficient time for a more popular proposal to be devised, there will be a delay of one year before any reform.

Capital Gains Tax

 After unfavourable consultation, the proposal for a 30-day window between Capital Gains arising and the tax being due has been deferred until April 2020.

 Research and Development

 Large companies claiming relief for research and development under the RDEC scheme will see their credit increase from 11% to 12% as part of plans to help the economy grow after Brexit.

Corporation Tax

Indexation Allowance – a long standing relief for companies making capital gains will be frozen from 01 January 2018. This allowance protected companies from gains that arise as a result of inflation and as a result no relief will be available for inflation accruing after this date. This move is perhaps unsurprising, with property investors more often operating through a limited company as a result of this allowance and the increased taxation of landlords in recent budgets.

 Stamp Duty

 With the youth vote rocketing in the last election, the government has decided to act further on the concerns that first time buyers are struggling to get on to the property ladder. Stamp duty will be abolished immediately for first time buyers purchasing properties worth up to £300,000. Those buying their first houses in expensive areas such as London will pay no stamp duty on the first £300,000 of properties costing up to £500,000.

 Value Added Tax (VAT)

 The VAT registration threshold will remain at £85,000 p/a for two years from April 2018. This will come as a relief for many, as some predicted this could be lowered to nearer the EU average of £25,000.

Making Tax Digital (MTD)

 As announced in July, no business will be mandated to use MTD until April 2019, and then only for VAT obligations. The scope of MTD will not be widened until April 2020 at the earliest.

The above are only the areas that I feel will be relevant to the majority of our clients, other areas and greater detail can be found on our website, click here. 

Please contact us on 0116 242 3400 if you have a specific query.

Matt Smith.

HMRC’s Worldwide Disclosure Facility (WDF)

This is a facility that the Inland Revenue introduced in 2016 which allows the voluntary disclosure of any UK tax liabilities that relate to offshore income or assets, which have not previously been disclosed to the UK tax authorities, to be declared.

This includes:

  • Income arising from a source outside the UK
  • Assets situated or held outside the UK
  • Activities carried on wholly or mainly outside the UK
  • Where the funds connected to unpaid tax are transferred outside the UK

Which years?

  • The facility applies to all tax years up to and including 2015 to 2016.
  • If HMRC has sent you a tax return for that year, or any tax year from 2013 to 2014 which is still outstanding, you must complete the return and you must not include these tax years on this disclosure form.

 

By contacting the Inland Revenue, rather than the Inland Revenue contacting you, the penalty regime will be less harsh.

 

If you think that the above applies to you then please get in touch with us as soon as possible so that the Inland Revenue can be notified. 0116 2423400

Julia Harrison, Tax Manager 

Hot Topic Making Tax Digital for Business

The government have issued information on how Making Tax Digital for Business (MTDfB) is expected to work for VAT once the rules are introduced in April 2019.

Under the proposed rules, which have been issued subject to consultation, VAT registered businesses with turnover over the VAT registration threshold will be required to submit their VAT return digitally using software. Businesses with a turnover above the VAT threshold (currently £85,000) will have to:

  • keep their records digitally (for VAT purposes only) and
  • provide their VAT return information to HMRC through Making Tax Digital (MTD) functional compatible software.

It has also been confirmed that MTD will be available on a voluntary basis to other businesses, for both VAT and income tax.

Exemptions will be available where HMRC are satisfied the business is run by a practising member of a religious society or order whose beliefs are incompatible with the use of electronic communications, some insolvent businesses; or where HMRC are satisfied that it is not reasonably practicable to make a return using an electronic return system for reasons of disability, age, remoteness of location or any other reason.

The proposed rules include provisions that where a business is in scope for MTD the business must use functional compatible software to meet the new requirements. This software will either be a software program or set of compatible software programs which can connect to HMRC systems via an Application Programming Interface (API). The functions of the compatible software include:

  • keeping records in a specified digital form
  • preserving digital records in a specified digital form
  • creating a VAT return from the digital records and providing HMRC with this information digitally
  • providing HMRC with VAT data on a voluntary basis and
  • receiving information from HMRC via the API platform that the business has complied.

Businesses will need to preserve digital records in the software for up to six years. The digital records include:

  • ‘designatory data’ including the business name, principal place of business and VAT registration number together with information about which VAT accounting schemes they use
  • the VAT account that each VAT registered business must keep, by law, and
  • information about supplies made and received.

Further information on the required information can be found in Annex 1.

The government will make the final detailed requirements available to the software providers by April 2018 to allow time for the software to be developed and tested prior to the rules coming into effect from April 2019.

VAT returns

Businesses within the scope of MTD for VAT will be required to submit their VAT returns using their functional compatible software.

The information contained with the VAT return will be generated by pulling information from the digital records. This information will contain as a minimum the 9 boxes required for the completion of the VAT return but can also contain a specific data set of supplementary information, all of which will be pulled from the digital records.

Businesses submitting monthly or non-standard period returns will be able to continue to do so. The VAT annual accounting scheme will also be retained with the current conditions. Businesses making these types of returns will also be required to keep digital records and submit their VAT returns through software.

Under the new rules some businesses may choose to voluntarily provide further information:

Periodic updates
Businesses will be able to submit VAT information more frequently than their VAT return obligations require on a voluntary basis as a ‘voluntary update’.
Supplementary data
HMRC believes that businesses and HMRC could benefit from the submission of supplementary data detailing how the figures in the return are arrived at. HMRC believe this additional data will help them target non compliance. The software will allow for the voluntary submission of supplementary VAT data as part of a VAT return or a voluntary update. This will allow HMRC to test with businesses the extent to which they and HMRC can benefit from such supplementary data.

Timescale

VAT is the first tax to be reportable under MTD and businesses within the scope of MTD will need to keep their records digitally, using approved MTD functional compatible software, from 1 April 2019. The software will create the return from the digital records and this will need to be submitted under MTD for return periods starting on or after 1 April 2019.

We will keep you informed of developments in this area and ensure we are ready to deal with the new requirements. Please contact us for more information 0116 2423400

New Vehicle Tax Rates April 2017

We all know that there are a few things we need to consider before buying a new car.

These are some common questions which are asked by clients (hopefully before they go ahead and make that major purchase):

“Should I purchase a car through my business or should I use my own car for business use?”

“Should I lease or purchase a car?”

…and perhaps the most common question of all:

“How much tax will I have to pay?”

You may be interested in purchasing an electric car because you are concerned about the environment.  The government have certainly put in place tax incentives to encourage us to think ‘green’ and, with BMW recently deciding to build their future electric cars in the UK, it would seem that the motor industry is following suit.

Despite the many obvious things we all have to consider when purchasing a new car perhaps there is one thing that you may not be aware of and that is the new vehicle tax rates that were introduced from 1 April 2017.

The way vehicle tax is calculated has changed for cars and some motor homes that were first registered with DVLA from 1 April 2017.  The change doesn’t affect any vehicle registered before 1 April 2017.

The rates explained

Vehicle tax for the first year is based on CO2 emissions.  From 1 April 2017 this rate has increased and is now between £0 for electric cars and £2,000 for the highest polluting cars.  Vehicle tax rates can be checked by visiting https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables.

After the first year, the amount of tax that needs to be paid depends on the type of vehicle. The rates are:

  • £140 a year for petrol or diesel vehicles
  • £130 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bioethanol and LPG)
  • £0 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions (electric vehicles)

New vehicles with a list price of more than £40,000

If a vehicle has a list price (the published price before any discounts) of more than £40,000, the rate of tax is based on CO2 emissions for the first year.

After the first year, the rate depends on the type of vehicle (petrol, diesel, alternative fuel or zero emissions) as above plus an additional £310 a year for each of the next 5 years.

After those 5 years, the vehicle will then be taxed at one of the standard rates (£140, £130, or £0) depending on vehicle type.

So for vehicles with a list price of more than £40,000, from the second time they are taxed and for the next 5 years, the amount of tax to pay will be as follows:

  • £450 a year for petrol or diesel vehicles
  • £440 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bioethanol and LPG)
  • £310 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions (electric vehicles)

If you are considering the purchase of a new car and would like more information about the new vehicle tax rates then please click on the following Youtube video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbV7Yfud1dE

There are certain accounting and tax issues associated with business vehicles so please get in touch if you have any questions about a vehicle you wish to use in your business.  Remember it is always a good idea to ask for advice before making a major purchase as it is important to know all the facts before making a decision.

If you would like to discuss any of this further then please contact us 0116 2423400

Beth Judd, Accounts & Tax