The Employment Allowance

What is employment allowance?

Employment Allowance is a National Insurance credit that is offset against Class 1 Employer’s NI. The maximum amount that can be claimed in each tax year is £3,000, although you can still claim if you pay less than £3,000. When it was first introduced in 2014 you could claim up to £2,000 but it increased to £3,000 in April 2016.

Eligibility

You can claim if:

  • You are a business, including sole traders and partnerships, or charity paying Employers Class 1 NI.
  • You can claim if you employ a care or support worker.

You can’t claim if:

  • You are a director and the only employee.
  • You employ someone for domestic work e.g. Cleaner or Gardener
  • You are a business that does more than half of your work in the public sector, for example the NHS.
  • If you have more than one employer PAYE reference, you can only claim against one of them.

How to claim Employment Allowance?

You would claim through your Payroll software and tick the box next to the “Eligible for Employment Allowance”. This will then send an EPS (Employer Payment Summary) to HMRC to let them know you’re eligible and to start claiming it.

In Sage 50 Payroll:

  • Go to “Company” on the left hand menu.
  • Then “Settings”.
  • Tick the box as shown.

If you use HMRC’s Basic PAYE tools:

  • Select the relevant Employer in the menu on the homepage.
  • Then select “Change employer details”.
  • Tick “Yes” in the “Employment Allowance indicator”.
  • Send an EPS as normal.

Stopping your claim:

You only need to stop your Employment Allowance claim if you stop being eligible. You do not need to stop your claim manually if you reach the £3,000 limit before the end of the tax year, this doesn’t make you ineligible. If you do stop this claim before the end of the tax year, any credit you have already been given will be removed and you will have to pay any Class 1 NI due.

When to claim?

You can claim at any time in the tax year. If you claim late and you don’t use your Employment Allowance against Class 1 National Insurance you have already paid to HMRC you can ask them to offset it against other liabilities e.g. Corporation Tax and VAT. If you have no outstanding liabilities you can also ask them to refund it directly to you.

If you were eligible, you can claim unused Employment Allowance for up to 4 previous years. Currently you can claim back the allowance from when it was first introduced in 2014.

If you need any further guidance HMRC’s employer guide to Employment Allowance is a very useful resource https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/employment-allowance

If you have any questions on the above or would like any more information, please feel free to contact us on 0116 242 3400.

Polly Dennis, Payroll Apprentice

Torr Waterfield 2017 Charity Challenge

So it’s that time of year again when the team brush the dust off their walking boots and start their training for the annual charity challenge.

This year we have chosen Alzheimer’s society as our charity of the year which many of the team hold close to their hearts. If you would like to know a little more about why we chose The Alzheimer’s Society please read our previous blog from Denise Burley https://torrwaterfield.wordpress.com/2017/03/07/torr-waterfields-2017-charity-of-the-year-alzheimers-society/

This year were heading to Wales!

Denise has set this year’s challenge which is to walk 46 miles in two days along the The Llyn Peninsula – Welsh Coast Path. Aberosch to Morfa Nefyn using the coast path is 45 miles.

LlynCPMapDay 1 = Abersoch to Aberdaron (21 miles)

Day 2 = Aberdaron to Morfa Nefyn (25 miles).

The Walk will start on the 23rd September with Mike Waterfield & Stuart Caney leading the TW team & their families.

It would be incredible if you could show some support for the team and make a donation small or large, it’s all for a great cause. Please Click Here or alternatively Text TORR47 £10 to 70070 (you can alter the amount so you can make it £5, £15, £20 etc.)

Thanks from all the Team.

Changes to information requirements about people with significant control

In 2016 UK companies and UK limited liability partnerships (LLPs) were required to keep a register of people with significant control (PSC register) and to file relevant information at Companies House.

New rules have now been introduced as part of the UK’s programme implementing the EU Fourth Anti-Money Laundering Directive and tackling money laundering and the financing of terrorist activity. Effectively, businesses are required to help police the system – in this case by supplying information about people with significant control (PSCs).

The new rules potentially affect companies and LLPs. There are also changes for Scottish limited partnerships and certain Scottish general partnerships (collectively referred to as ‘eligible Scottish partnerships’).

Most of these changes come into force from 26 June 2017, with some coming into force from 24 July 2017.

Overview of changes

There are three main areas of change:

  • how companies and LLPs report PSC information to Companies House
  • changes to exemptions
  • bringing some partnerships governed by the law of Scotland into the regime.

There is information on each of these areas of change below.

Changes in reporting

There are new timescales and new forms. Previously, PSC information was updated annually on confirmation statement CS01. Change is now event-driven and must be reported to Companies House whenever it occurs. It can no longer wait until the end of the year.

From now on, companies will need to use forms PSC01 to PSC09. LLPs and eligible Scottish partnerships will use an equivalent range of forms.

When the annual confirmation statement is made, confirmation will be required that PSC information which Companies House already holds is accurate.

There are 14 days to update the PSC register, and another 14 days to send the information to Companies House. That gives 28 days to notify Companies House of changes to the PSC register.

Exemptions

Under the old rules, some companies were exempt from the PSC rules. These were DTR5 companies which are not on a regulated market.

Under the new rules, such companies may have to comply. This could affect Alternative Investment Market companies (AIM) and ISDX (ICAP Securities and Derivatives Exchange) companies.

If the company has traded on an EEA or Schedule 1 specified market, it is still exempt from providing PSC information.

Partnerships governed by Scots law

The new rules apply a modified form of the PSC regime to limited partnerships governed by the law of Scotland and also to qualifying general partnerships governed by the law of Scotland. A qualifying general partnership is a partnership in which all partners are corporate bodies.

These partnerships do not have to keep their own PSC register, but do now have to report PSC information to Companies House. They have to identify their PSCs and return this information to Companies House within 14 days of 24 July 2017.

Any further changes to PSC information must be notified to Companies House within 14 days of the change.

Confirmation that details are still current and accurate will be required annually.

Is further guidance available?

The Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has updated its guidance on the PSC register. There is draft statutory guidance on what ‘significant influence or control’ means for eligible Scottish partnerships, and guidance for people with significant control.

All the guidance can be obtained from www.gov.uk/government/organisations/companies-house.

How can we help?

This is a complex area, especially if you are coming into the regime for the first time. It can also be a risky area, as failure to comply with the rules could lead to the business, its directors or partners, or identified PSCs committing a criminal offence.

If you would like to discuss these new requirements in more detail, or require assistance with this or other company secretarial requirement please contact us on 0116 2423400

Mike Waterfield

DirectorDSC_2398.JPG

Are you due a tax refund, or is it a fake HMRC email / phone call?

In the current cyber-world attempted fraud is always increasing and taxpayers need to watch out not only for scam emails and texts but phone calls too.

Phishing emails are designed to steal personal or financial details and may also deliver malicious software.  Some of the most common examples involve HMRC and an email advising a taxpayer about a “tax refund notification”.  It asks the recipient to click on a link, which then requests personal banking details – leading individuals unwittingly to compromise their financial security.  HMRC scam emails often contain the taxman’s logo and official style reference numbers and increasingly appear to be genuine communications.  Scammers often sign off using the name of an actual member of HMRC staff.  These criminals are getting cleverer all the time sending their emails at peak times i.e. January, when it’s the deadline for completing your self-assessment return, and July, being the deadline for your tax credits submission.

Tax payers please take note that HMRC do not make contact by email or phone to advise you of a refund and never give personal information over the phone to someone you do not know.  If you are in any doubt contact your accountant/advisor immediately.

An example of a typical phishing email purporting to be from HMRC is shown below:

HMRC SCam

If you think you may have received something that isn’t legitimate or you’re unsure then please contact us on 0116 2423400

Mark Cunnold, Client Manager 

Thinking of an Upgrade?

If the seemingly endless adverts are to be believed then if you subscribe to online bookkeeping software such as QuickBooks or Xero then your bookkeeping will become effortless, will probably be done in a coffee shop or on the go and will leave your accountant kissing an iPad with glee.

Whilst new software isn’t going to change your life, there is a lot to be said for having access to your records from any laptop/tablet/phone and from anywhere with a decent internet connection.

Online bookkeeping software allows you to send invoices and quotes to potential customers from your phone, enter purchase invoices from the sofa and even have bank transactions feed directly from your bank into the software to reduce the time taken to reconcile your bank.

The software can often be used by multiple users simultaneously, are compatible with Windows, Apple & Android operating systems and have a range of add-ons to allow data to be linked with third party software such as GoCardless or iZettle.

Cloud based software is constantly backed-up and saved by the software provider, and you can grant us direct access so there is no more need for taking and sending over backups. The software is constantly updated too so there’s no need to upgrade every few years.

If you’d like to discuss the packages available for your bookkeeping needs, or if you’re a Sage user and looking to upgrade to one of their subscription based products, please contact us and we can find the best option for you – we might even be able to obtain a lower subscription cost compared to going direct.

 

Matt Smith, Accounts Audit & Tax  

0116 24243400

The Right to work in the UK

Do you know how to carry out a ‘right to work in the UK check?

The Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 places a duty on employers to carry out checks to confirm someone’s right to work in the UK before employing them.

Punishments for employing an illegal worker are:

  • £20,000 for each illegal worker employed
  • Up to five years imprisonment for knowingly employing an illegal worker

Some employers may not know the specific checks and check-ups that must be used when employing a new worker:

The ‘Right to work Check’

Employers must carry out a ‘Right to work check’ on a worker before the employment begins to ensure that he or she is legally allowed to work in the UK and do the work in question. This check should be carried out on all employees to maintain accuracy and avoid any discrimination.

The ‘Right to work check’ means that an employer must check that a document, provided by the worker, is acceptable for showing the employee’s permission to work in the UK. There are three key steps to determine the check:

  1. Obtain the original version of one or more of the permitted documents
  2. Check the validity in the presence of the holder (worker)
  3. Take and retain a clear copy of the document in an un-editable format, e.g. PDF / JPEG, and record the date of the check.

These copies must be kept until 2 years after the employment ends.

List A and List B

HMRC provides two lists that show the documents required to prove a worker has the right to work in the UK. List A gives the documents that show the holder has an ongoing right to work in the UK. If an employer checks these correctly, they have an excuse against payment of a civil fine for the duration of that person’s employment.

Alternatively, List B gives documents that show the holder has the right to work in the UK for a limited time only. If an employer checks these correctly, they have an excuse against a civil penalty for a limited time. To retain a statutory excuse, another check must be carried out towards the end of this period.

HMRC’s employers guide to acceptable right to work documents explains list A and list B:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/acceptable-right-to-work-documents-an-employers-guide

HMRC also provide an online interactive tool on checking somebodies right to work in the UK. This should be used when carrying out the checking of documents, if extra clarification is needed:

If you have any questions on the above or would like any more information, please feel free to contact us on 0116 2423400.

Zahra Bates, Payroll Assistant 

Tax Calendar

The following Tax Events are due on 19th July 2017:

Business Tax Events

PAYE quarterly payments are due for small employers for the pay periods 6th April 2017 to 5th July 2017.

This deadline is relevant to small employers and contractors only. As a small employer with income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions of less than £1,500 a month you are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions on a quarterly basis.

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 21st July 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Saturday 22nd July. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

PAYE Student loan and CIS deductions due for the month to 5th July 2017.

This deadline is relevant to employers who have made PAYE deductions from their employees’ salaries and to contractors who have paid subcontractors under the CIS.

Employers are required to make payment to HMRC of the income tax, national insurance and student loan deductions. Contractors are required to make payment to HMRC of the tax deductions made from subcontractors under the CIS.  

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 21st July 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Saturday 22nd July. In year interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties also apply.

Class 1A NIC due for 2016/17.

This deadline is relevant for employers who have provided their employees with benefits for 2016/17. These benefits should have been reported by the 6th July and the amount of the Class 1A employer only NI liability due calculated on the form P11D(b).

Where the payment is made electronically the deadline for receipt of cleared payment is Friday 21st July 2017 unless you are able to arrange a ‘Faster Payment’ to clear on or by Saturday 22nd July. Interest will be charged if payment is made late. Penalties may also apply. 

We have a Tax Calendar on our website so you never miss a deadline to see future deadlines please visit our calendar  https://www.torrwaterfield.co.uk/resources/tax-calendar 

New £10 Note

New £10 Note

It has recently been revealed that the new £10 note will have the face of the famous writer Jane Austen featured on the front.

Production of the new note began last August, however it is due to be launched on the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death, July 18th, and all notes are to be issued during September 2017.

The current £10 note is the oldest Bank of England bank note which is currently still in circulation and, due to developments in technology, the security features can now be updated.

New features

The new note will be made of the same polymer materials as the £5 note.

It will be slightly bigger than the polymer £5 note, however it will be smaller than the current £10 note that is still in circulation.

The polymer notes are being introduced as they are cleaner, more secure and also much more durable than the old notes.

There has been no date released for when the old £10 notes will leave circulation, however I am sure that this will be announced closer to the time.

Over 20 countries currently issue polymer banknotes which include Australia, who introduced them in 1998, New Zealand, Mexico, Singapore and Canada who introduced them in 2011.

September 2017 is nearly upon us, so just bear in mind that these new notes will be replacing the old notes shortly.

For more information please see The Bank of England website here or contact us.

Jessica Cooper, Accounts & Tax 

COMMUNITY INTEREST COMPANIES (CIC) – DID YOU KNOW?

A CIC is the usual legal entity for operators of a social enterprise that is non-charitable.

A CIC can be set up as a normal company ie as a company limited by shares or a company limited by guarantee.

A CIC enjoys the benefit of limited liability.

A CIC must undertake an activity that fulfils a social purpose.

A CIC is allowed to pay a salary to its directors.

Paid directors are allowed to be members of the Board.

A CIC can issue loans and bonds but there may be restrictions on the amount of interest that it may pay.

A CIC can issue shares but there are restrictions on their disposal and the amount of any dividends it may pay.

Assets of a CIC may only be disposed of at open market value and the proceeds used for community purposes.

If a CIC is wound up its assets must be transferred to another body with the same restriction on asset disposal.

A CIC is covered by the same tax regime as a normal company.

A CIC is required to file its accounts at Companies House each year.

A CIC is required to file a separate report at Companies House each year detailing aspects of its activities.

If you consider we may be able to assist with the operation of your CIC or in your decision as to whether a CIC would be appropriate for you please contact us. 0116 2423400 

Richard Jeffreys, Senior Audit Manager 

When Do I Have To Register for VAT?

If you are aware of an increase in turnover, or are unsure about whether you should be VAT registered or not, the following points should help:                                                      

  • If your turnover exceeds the registration threshold of £85,000 over a rolling 12 month period then you will need to register for VAT; you will then need to calculate at what point your turnover broke this threshold.
  • Once you know when you exceeded the registration threshold, you need to register by the end of the following month. For example, if the threshold was breached on 31 August, you have to register by 30 September and will be registered from 1 October.
  • If you expect you will breach the registration threshold in a single 30 day period, you must register for VAT immediately.
  • If you are late registering for VAT, then you must pay what you owe from the point at which you should have registered; as well as interest there may be penalties which depend on what you owe and how late your registration is.
  • It is possible to get an exception from registering if your turnover goes over the threshold temporarily. To do this you need to write to HMRC with evidence as to why you believe your net turnover won’t go over £83,000 (de-registration threshold) in the next 12 months. HMRC will then respond confirming whether an exception has been granted or not – this is not always guaranteed – and if denied, they will register you for VAT.
  • You can also register at any point voluntarily – you must pay HMRC any VAT you owe from the date that you become registered.

If you are unsure, there is a helpful link online (www.gov.uk/vat-registration/overview) which explains in further detail the steps you should take when registering for VAT.

If you have any queries or concerns with regards to any aspect of VAT, feel free to give our office a ring on 0116 242 3400 and we will be happy to discuss this with you. 

Jake Dempsey, Accounts & Tax