The benefits of becoming an apprentice

By deciding to do an apprenticeship the transition from school into the working world was made a lot easier. I still wanted to learn and get qualifications but I found this difficult to do in a classroom as the learning was not hands-on. By doing an apprenticeship I gained intimate knowledge of the work environment which I could not have done in a classroom.

With apprenticeships there are excellent progression opportunities with different levels you can do. With the support of a skills assessor you can easily work out the best course for you, which for me was a level 2 NVQ in Business & Administration. Because the work involved in completing the NVQ was based on my job role, it was easy to complete and I could take skills I learnt from my apprenticeship and use it in my job role. I’ve now progressed on to a level 3 NVQ which I am due to finish in the next couple of weeks.

I was also able to free up some of our existing staff’s time by helping with the work they may not have currently had time to do. As well as gaining extra experience by doing this, it is also extremely helpful for Torr Waterfield and my co-workers.

The benefits of hiring an apprentice

Hiring an apprentice can make the recruitment process easier and quicker for employers as training providers will help with pretty much the entire process such as filtering CV’s, finding and recruiting an apprentice, training and accessing funding.

The wage an apprentice earns is based on their age and the sector they work in which makes it far more cost effective than hiring older, skilled and qualified staff. The cost of training can also be fully government funded or contributed to, however this again depends on the age of the apprentice and the sector your business falls within.

For more information on becoming or hiring an apprentice you can visit https://www.gov.uk/topic/further-education-skills/apprenticeships or call us on 0116 2423400 

Amy Fisher

Administrator/Reception_DSC1514

Are you a parent? What are your childcare choices?

In our Winter 2016 newsletter we led with an article about the new Tax-Free Childcare scheme that was expected to be launched in early 2017.

HM Revenue and Customs have today launched the Childcare Choices website which can be reached from the related article:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-families-will-soon-see-bills-cut-as-date-announced-for-the-launch-of-tax-free-childcare

The article also gives details of the availability of up to 30 hours of free childcare for 3 to 4 year olds from September this year.

We understand that parents can pre-register from Wednesday, with the new scheme launching at the end of April.

If you require any further information or advice then please contact us 0116 2423400 

Neil Fordintro-desktop-full

Shared parental leave – What are you entitled to?

Shared parental leave (SPL) allows employed parents and adopters to share leave and pay with their partner to care for children from birth until their first birthday.

  • Only employees can take SPL; they must have a partner (separated partners still qualify if sharing responsibility for care of child at the time of birth)
  • SPL allows mothers (or adopters) to shorten their maternity leave (and pay) to share the leave (and pay) with their partner in order to care for children in their first year; it is the mother’s choice whether to share leave
  • The mother can only share with one person; it is her choice provided her partner satisfies the qualifying conditions
  • Even if only one parent is entitled to SPL and/or ShPP (e.g. one is self-employed or not entitled to ShPP), the other partner may still  be entitled to SPL/ShPP if both satisfy the qualifying conditions
  • The employee taking SPL must have been employed 26 weeks by the 15th week before the expected week of childbirth and remain employed in the week before the start of SPL. Their partner must also satisfy an employment and earnings test
  • At least 8 weeks’ written notice must be given to end maternity leave and start of SPL
  • SPL can only be taken a week at a time but can start mid-week. SPLIT days can be used to work part-time by agreement with employer
  • SPL can be taken by both parents at the same time or at separate times; they must decide how to take it. The mother can remain on maternity leave while the partner is on SPL
  • SPL can be taken in up to three separate blocks (unlike maternity leave) or more if the employer agrees
  • There are detailed notice provisions which must be followed
  • Employees can work for up to 20 days during SPL (SPLIT days), as well as 10 days during maternity leave (KIT days). These must be agreed with employer.

 SHARED PARENTAL PAY (ShPP) 

Can pay be transferred as well as leave?

Yes.  Statutory maternity pay (SMP) is available to female employees from the 11th week before the expected week of birth or the actual birth if earlier.  It is paid for 39 weeks (the maternity pay period – MPP) with the first 6 weeks being at 90% of pay (and then either the flat rate of £139.58 or 90 per cent if this is lower for the remaining 33 weeks.  But, only 37 weeks is available for ShPP as the mother must take the first 2 weeks after the birth. Women who do not qualify for SMP will often qualify for maternity allowance which is paid at £139.58 or 90 per cent of average earnings if this is lower.

If you wish to discuss any of this in more detail please contact us 0116 2423400 

Becky Edwards, Payroll Manager 

A day in the life of a junior accountant

Some of you may think that training to become an accountant involves going to university and graduating with a degree – but this is not always the case. Here is my day as a junior accountant:

It’s the dreaded Monday morning and I’m waking up nice and early so that I can attempt to miss the rush hour traffic. Get into work, turn on my computer and sit down with a brew to wake me up before starting work.

First job is a set of accounts, looking through the income and expenses, then knuckling down to balance some control accounts!

At 10am I have a catch up with one of the directors to discuss my plan of action for the week including jobs that need completing, what bills need raising, any deadlines that are looming and any courses that I will be taking.

After that I will carry on with the set of accounts I am working on for the rest of the morning, making sure that I make full use of my lunch by working on some booklets that need completing in order for me to pass my AAT qualification – currently I am working on ‘developing commercial awareness’ which involves me producing a presentation to show to my tutor based on Torr Waterfield.

When lunch is over, I will pass the finished set of accounts over to my trainer who will look through them to adjust any notes or figures to make sure that the accounts are correct. Once he has passed these back to me, I will review the notes so that I am aware of anything that I will need to look out for on my next job and do the amendments that are necessary.

It’s now time to see the client manager with the job who will scrutinize the figures and ask any questions that they will need to know in order to have a successful meeting with the client.

Once the manager has reviewed the file and is happy with the figures I will contact the client to arrange the meeting.

It’s now 5.15pm- but my day is not over!

Time for college now to learn about ‘budgeting’ for one of my five AAT level 4 exams.

At 5.45pm the tutor will go through the aims of that lesson and then the lesson commences; a 5 minute break at 7.15pm. Just an hour left!

We complete some practice questions as a group, and then jot down the home work that the tutor has set us for that week.

Finally 8.15pm – it is home time!

Jessica Cooper , Accounts & Tax