Autumn Budget – 29 October 2018

So, we already knew about some of the announcements before the chancellor, the Rt. Hon. Philip Hammond MP, spoke yesterday, so much so he even made a joke about toilets and leaks. As ever there was good news and bad news for taxpayers, a full summary is on our website but here are some good news/bad news highlights:

If you are a business…

Good news

  • Capital allowances – Annual Investment Allowance (AIA) increasing from £200,000 pa to £1million pa for 2 years from 1 January 2019
  • Capital allowances – a new Structures and Buildings Allowance (SBA) for non-residential buildings on eligible construction costs on or after 29 October 2018, this will enable business to claim 2% pa on cost
  • The corporation tax rate, as previously announced, will drop to 17% from 2020

Bad news

  • Capital allowances – the writing down allowance (WDA) on special rate pools, for things such as cars with CO2 emissions of over 130g/km, reducing from 8% to 6% pa
  • Capital allowances – discontinued 100% allowances for energy & water efficient equipment, although you will still be able to claim AIA’s
  • National Living Wage (previously National Minimum Wage) for over 25’s increasing from £7.83 per hour to £8.21 (which also has an effect on the auto-enrolment pension contribution cost)

And more bad news for larger companies

  • Digital Services Tax – for large digital companies (e.g. Amazon) – 2% on revenues linked to UK
  • Corporate capital loss restriction for large companies (from April 2020) – there is already a £5m cap on income losses, this is now extended to capital losses as well
  • Employment allowance restricted to businesses below £100,000 employers NIC
  • R&D tax credit (cashing in instead of reducing tax bill) capped at 3 times the PAYE & NIC liability
  • Off payroll working (IR35) currently in force for public companies will be introduced on private medium and large companies (although not until 2020) – PAYE and NIC will be deducted from the deemed employee and Employers National Insurance will be payable by the company.

If you are an Employee…

Good news

  • Personal allowance increasing from £11,850 to £12,500
  • Higher rate threshold increasing from £46,350 to £50,000 (these two increases will mean a basic rate tax payer will save £130 pa, a higher rate tax payer £860 pa and an additional rate taxpayer £600 pa)
  • National Living Wage for over 25’s increasing from £7.83 per hour to £8.21

Bad news

Other taxes…

Good news

  • Stamp Duty – First time buyers of a qualifying shared ownership in a property of £500,000 or less will get an exemption from SDLT and this is backdated to 22 November 2017 (i.e. you can claim a refund)
  • Stamp duty refunds – the time to make a claim for a refund on the 3% supplement on buying your new home before selling your old home, has been extended from 3 months to 12 months from the sale of your old home (although the filing deadline for SDLT returns is reduced to 14 days after the effective rate of transaction)
  • Capital Gains – annual exemption increased from £11,700 to £12,000 pa

Bad news

  • Rent a room relief – you will actually need to have shared the premises during part of the time you are claiming the relief, effectively excluding income from places like Airbnb
  • Entrepreneurs relief – to qualify, the minimum period is extended from 12 months to 24 months
  • Capital Gains – private residence relief final period exemption reduced from 18 months to 9 months
  • Capital Gains – lettings relief will only apply when the property is in shared ownership with a tenant, in reality this means very few people will qualify and therefore only get private residence relief on sale of their home, however this is subject to consultation and may well change

The above is only a brief summary of the proposed changes. For a more detailed breakdown please visit our website here.

If you have any questions about the budget, or how it will impact you or your business, please contact us on 0116 242 3400 and we will be happy to help.

Denise Burley

P11Ds – Return of Expenses and Benefits

It is that time of year again when your organisation’s P11D forms will need to be prepared and submitted to the Inland Revenue. The most common entries being the car or van benefit, with or without fuel for private use.

In addition to the above, directors/employees are sometimes provided with private health insurance.  The best way of dealing with this is to ensure that the contract is between the employer and the insurance company and therefore the amount is treated as a benefit in kind and reported on a P11D 

However, sometimes the employer will offer to pay the employee’s personal medical insurance directly.  In this case the contract for the health insurance will be between the insurance company and the director/employee and the payment is treated very differently to the above.  If the company pays the bill on behalf of the employee the amount is entered onto the P11D for tax purposes but is dealt with through the payroll for National Insurance.  This, as you can imagine, gets very messy.

This does not just apply to medical insurance but also any contract in the director/employee’s name that the employer settles on behalf of the director/employee.  Another common one that springs to mind is a mobile phone bill. 

The moral of the above is to set up medical insurance/mobile phone contracts between the employer and the supplier directly which simplifies the treatment of dealing with the whole reporting process.

The above is just a small part of the P11D system so please get in touch if you require any help. 0116 24243400 or info@torrwaterfield.co.uk

Julia Harrison , Tax Manager 

New Vehicle Tax Rates April 2017

We all know that there are a few things we need to consider before buying a new car.

These are some common questions which are asked by clients (hopefully before they go ahead and make that major purchase):

“Should I purchase a car through my business or should I use my own car for business use?”

“Should I lease or purchase a car?”

…and perhaps the most common question of all:

“How much tax will I have to pay?”

You may be interested in purchasing an electric car because you are concerned about the environment.  The government have certainly put in place tax incentives to encourage us to think ‘green’ and, with BMW recently deciding to build their future electric cars in the UK, it would seem that the motor industry is following suit.

Despite the many obvious things we all have to consider when purchasing a new car perhaps there is one thing that you may not be aware of and that is the new vehicle tax rates that were introduced from 1 April 2017.

The way vehicle tax is calculated has changed for cars and some motor homes that were first registered with DVLA from 1 April 2017.  The change doesn’t affect any vehicle registered before 1 April 2017.

The rates explained

Vehicle tax for the first year is based on CO2 emissions.  From 1 April 2017 this rate has increased and is now between £0 for electric cars and £2,000 for the highest polluting cars.  Vehicle tax rates can be checked by visiting https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables.

After the first year, the amount of tax that needs to be paid depends on the type of vehicle. The rates are:

  • £140 a year for petrol or diesel vehicles
  • £130 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bioethanol and LPG)
  • £0 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions (electric vehicles)

New vehicles with a list price of more than £40,000

If a vehicle has a list price (the published price before any discounts) of more than £40,000, the rate of tax is based on CO2 emissions for the first year.

After the first year, the rate depends on the type of vehicle (petrol, diesel, alternative fuel or zero emissions) as above plus an additional £310 a year for each of the next 5 years.

After those 5 years, the vehicle will then be taxed at one of the standard rates (£140, £130, or £0) depending on vehicle type.

So for vehicles with a list price of more than £40,000, from the second time they are taxed and for the next 5 years, the amount of tax to pay will be as follows:

  • £450 a year for petrol or diesel vehicles
  • £440 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bioethanol and LPG)
  • £310 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions (electric vehicles)

If you are considering the purchase of a new car and would like more information about the new vehicle tax rates then please click on the following Youtube video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbV7Yfud1dE

There are certain accounting and tax issues associated with business vehicles so please get in touch if you have any questions about a vehicle you wish to use in your business.  Remember it is always a good idea to ask for advice before making a major purchase as it is important to know all the facts before making a decision.

If you would like to discuss any of this further then please contact us 0116 2423400

Beth Judd, Accounts & Tax