Shared parental leave – What are you entitled to?

Shared parental leave (SPL) allows employed parents and adopters to share leave and pay with their partner to care for children from birth until their first birthday.

  • Only employees can take SPL; they must have a partner (separated partners still qualify if sharing responsibility for care of child at the time of birth)
  • SPL allows mothers (or adopters) to shorten their maternity leave (and pay) to share the leave (and pay) with their partner in order to care for children in their first year; it is the mother’s choice whether to share leave
  • The mother can only share with one person; it is her choice provided her partner satisfies the qualifying conditions
  • Even if only one parent is entitled to SPL and/or ShPP (e.g. one is self-employed or not entitled to ShPP), the other partner may still  be entitled to SPL/ShPP if both satisfy the qualifying conditions
  • The employee taking SPL must have been employed 26 weeks by the 15th week before the expected week of childbirth and remain employed in the week before the start of SPL. Their partner must also satisfy an employment and earnings test
  • At least 8 weeks’ written notice must be given to end maternity leave and start of SPL
  • SPL can only be taken a week at a time but can start mid-week. SPLIT days can be used to work part-time by agreement with employer
  • SPL can be taken by both parents at the same time or at separate times; they must decide how to take it. The mother can remain on maternity leave while the partner is on SPL
  • SPL can be taken in up to three separate blocks (unlike maternity leave) or more if the employer agrees
  • There are detailed notice provisions which must be followed
  • Employees can work for up to 20 days during SPL (SPLIT days), as well as 10 days during maternity leave (KIT days). These must be agreed with employer.

 SHARED PARENTAL PAY (ShPP) 

Can pay be transferred as well as leave?

Yes.  Statutory maternity pay (SMP) is available to female employees from the 11th week before the expected week of birth or the actual birth if earlier.  It is paid for 39 weeks (the maternity pay period – MPP) with the first 6 weeks being at 90% of pay (and then either the flat rate of £139.58 or 90 per cent if this is lower for the remaining 33 weeks.  But, only 37 weeks is available for ShPP as the mother must take the first 2 weeks after the birth. Women who do not qualify for SMP will often qualify for maternity allowance which is paid at £139.58 or 90 per cent of average earnings if this is lower.

If you wish to discuss any of this in more detail please contact us 0116 2423400 

Becky Edwards, Payroll Manager 

Charities and Fundraising – New changes

The Fundraising Regulator fundraisingregulator.org.uk was established a year ago to oversee charity fundraising in England and Wales.  There are different rules for charities registered in Scotland.

The new body assumed responsibility for this area on 7 July 2016.

So far most people are unaware of its existence, but that should change as we proceed into 2017.  Generally the Code of Fundraising Practice will affect charities and anyone involved in their management.  The general public should however be aware of the new rules and there are schemes being drawn up to protect people from over eager charities.

The biggest effect on charities is that the Fundraising Regulator will be funded by a voluntary levy.  Charities with spending of over £100,000 on fundraising will be asked to pay between £150 and £15,000 annually, this being on a sliding scale with the top end only being relevant for a small number of very large charities; exempt charities will be charged a flat rate of £1,000.

Below the £100,000 threshold, a charity may choose to register and pay just £50.

Third party fundraising agencies and similar organisations may also sign up and pay between £100 and £1,200 annually.

Although, as already stated, this is a voluntary levy, it is important for charities to consider the message they are giving out by not being registered.  It may well influence potential donors if they feel that the charity is not abiding by the Code.  The government has also retained powers within the legislation to make the levy compulsory if the voluntary approach does not work!

Finally, the Regulator is working on a Fundraising Preference Service which should be launched this year.  This will enable individuals to register and then have control over how, or whether, charities contact them for fundraising purposes.  This is expected to work in a similar fashion to the existing Telephone Preference Service and the Mail Preference Service.

There is of course much more detail behind all of this and we will be happy to help. Please get in touch if you would like to discuss this further 0116 2423400

Neil Ford, Technical Manager Neil Ford April 2012